Posts tagged jack kerouac

“The details are the life of it, I insist, say everything on your mind, don’t hold back, don’t analyze or anything as you go along, say it out.” — Jack Kerouac, The Subterraneans (1958)

“The details are the life of it, I insist, say everything on your mind, don’t hold back, don’t analyze or anything as you go along, say it out.” — Jack Kerouac, The Subterraneans (1958)

nypl:


Holding up mypurring cat to the moonI sighed.

— Jack Kerouac, American Haiku, 1959

nypl:

Holding up my
purring cat to the moon
I sighed.

— Jack Kerouac, American Haiku, 1959

Jack Kerouac Reading Beatnik Poetry in Lower East Side Loft, February 15, 1959 — Fred W. McDarrah

Jack Kerouac Reading Beatnik Poetry in Lower East Side Loft, February 15, 1959 — Fred W. McDarrah

Jack Kerouac in Greenwich Village, 1958 — Jerry Yulsman

Jack Kerouac in Greenwich Village, 1958 — Jerry Yulsman

“One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple.” ― Jack Kerouac, The Dharma Bums (1958)

“One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple.” ― Jack Kerouac, The Dharma Bums (1958)


“Time being of the essence in the purity of speech, sketching language is undisturbed flow from the mind of personal secret idea-words, blowing (as per jazz musician) on subject of image.” In 1957, Jack Kerouac published “Essentials of Spontaneous Prose,” in response to a request from Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs to explain how he wrote The Subterraneans in three days. (via)

“Time being of the essence in the purity of speech, sketching language is undisturbed flow from the mind of personal secret idea-words, blowing (as per jazz musician) on subject of image.” In 1957, Jack Kerouac published “Essentials of Spontaneous Prose,” in response to a request from Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs to explain how he wrote The Subterraneans in three days. (via)




Jack Kerouac, railroad brakeman’s rule-book in pocket…206 East 7th Street near Tompkins Park, Manhattan, probably September 1953 — Allen Ginsberg

Jack Kerouac, railroad brakeman’s rule-book in pocket…206 East 7th Street near Tompkins Park, Manhattan, probably September 1953 — Allen Ginsberg


In 1952, Jack Kerouac was shopping On The Road to publishers and instead of just pitching the text, Kerouac also included his own sketched vision for the book’s cover.
Kerouac typed a note to potential publisher A.A. Wyn in the corner of his drawing explaining the concept:
Dear Mr. Wyn:
I submit this as my idea of an appealing commercial cover expressive of the book. The cover for “The Town and the City” was as dull as the title and the photo backflap. Wilbur Pippin’s photo of me is the perfect On the Road one … it will look like the face of the figure below.
J.K.

In 1952, Jack Kerouac was shopping On The Road to publishers and instead of just pitching the text, Kerouac also included his own sketched vision for the book’s cover.

Kerouac typed a note to potential publisher A.A. Wyn in the corner of his drawing explaining the concept:

Dear Mr. Wyn:

I submit this as my idea of an appealing commercial cover expressive of the book. The cover for “The Town and the City” was as dull as the title and the photo backflap. Wilbur Pippin’s photo of me is the perfect On the Road one … it will look like the face of the figure below.

J.K.