Dusty and Sweets McGee (Floyd Mutrux, 1971)

Of all the anomalous movies released by the major Hollywood studios during the Seventies, the strangest is Dusty and Sweets McGee. The directorial debut of Floyd Mutrux, it was released by Warner Bros. in July 1971 and then quickly withdrawn. It has screened very seldom since. So it’s more a legend than a cult film…
The film is a partly fictional, partly documentary portrait of some young people living in Los Angeles who have tuned out, turned out, and dropped out of the society around them. Most of them are junkies playing themselves, but there are also some dealers (played by actors, among them the cinematographer William A. Fraker and Billy Gray as a street dealer named City Life), and a male hustler.
Dusty and Sweets McGee is the least histrionic movie about heroin addicts ever made in the U.S. Nothing dramatic happens until the last few minutes of the film, then quickly there’s a heist, a bust, and a death by overdose. For the first 80 minutes, there are monologues (some humorous and some horrific), languorous scenes of shooting up, scenes of everyday life (mostly petty arguments, buying and selling, spinning yarns), and the most beautiful and economical montages of driving in Los Angeles ever filmed.

Dusty and Sweets McGee (Floyd Mutrux, 1971)

Of all the anomalous movies released by the major Hollywood studios during the Seventies, the strangest is Dusty and Sweets McGee. The directorial debut of Floyd Mutrux, it was released by Warner Bros. in July 1971 and then quickly withdrawn. It has screened very seldom since. So it’s more a legend than a cult film…

The film is a partly fictional, partly documentary portrait of some young people living in Los Angeles who have tuned out, turned out, and dropped out of the society around them. Most of them are junkies playing themselves, but there are also some dealers (played by actors, among them the cinematographer William A. Fraker and Billy Gray as a street dealer named City Life), and a male hustler.

Dusty and Sweets McGee is the least histrionic movie about heroin addicts ever made in the U.S. Nothing dramatic happens until the last few minutes of the film, then quickly there’s a heist, a bust, and a death by overdose. For the first 80 minutes, there are monologues (some humorous and some horrific), languorous scenes of shooting up, scenes of everyday life (mostly petty arguments, buying and selling, spinning yarns), and the most beautiful and economical montages of driving in Los Angeles ever filmed.

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  1. wandrlust posted this